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Law Offices of Jonathan M. Cooper

New York Noncompete, Trade Secret & School Negligence Blog

This blog by the six-time published author Jonathan Cooper, is intended to educate the general public about issues of interest, particularly innovations and changes in the law, in the areas of non-compete agreements, breach of contract matters, school negligence (and/or negligent supervision), construction accidentsslip and/or trip and fall accidentsauto accidents, and, of course, defective or dangerous products

For additional information on any of these topics, readers are encouraged to download these FREE e-books:

 


11/29/2010
Jonathan Cooper
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In Partisan Vote, CPSC Approves New Consumer Website for Product Complaints

Author of the Free Guide to Defective Product Cases in New York, "Why Are There So Few Successful Defective Products Lawsuits?" (www.ProductsLiabilityBook.com), Long Island and Queens defective products lawyer Jonathan Cooper discusses the announcement of the launch of the Consumer Products Safety Commission's new consumer complaints database, www.saferproducts.gov. For additional information on this topic, please contact Jonathan Cooper directly at 516-791-5700.

Category: Keyword Search: consumer product safety improvement act

12/24/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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CPSC Launches New Product Registration Initiative - But They Can - And Should - Do Better

In this article, Long Island, New York children's safety and defective products attorney Jonathan Cooper discusses how the CPSC's newest initiative to improve product registrations is welcome, but falls short of the mark in enhancing the defective product recall process. For additional information on these topics, please download Jonathan Cooper's Free eBook entitled "Why Are There So Few Successful Defective Products Lawsuits?" from www.ProductLiabilityBook.com.

Category: Keyword Search: consumer product safety improvement act

8/13/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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Earlier today, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission issued a press release reminding everyone in the chain of distribution of children's products, from manufacturers and distributors to resellers and retailers that many of the provisions of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act become effective tomorrow.

Interestingly, one of the provisions of the Act that has received the least attention (most of the Act is focused on the lead level in children's toys) may have the most promise in terms of its likelihood to improve product safety: new labeling requirements.

Under the Act, manufacturers are now required (unless manifestly impractical) to put permanent tracking labels on any consumer product that is targeted for use by children aged 12 and younger. These tracking labels must identify the name of the manufacturer and its location, the date the product was manufactured, and must specify information from the manufacturing process itself, including the lot or batch number.

The immediate and practical benefits to this provision are twofold:

  1. At the first hint that a product may be defectively designed, and a recall may be needed, it will be far easier to identify which specific products need to be recalled, and concurrently, to track where the recalled products were sold. As a natural consequence, it should make product recall efforts far simpler and more effective.
  2. It will help claimants who have been injured by a defective product to identify with greater specificity the potentially responsible parties, and thereby reduce the litigation costs borne by parties with no real connection to the products at issue.


Category: Keyword Search: consumer product safety improvement act