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Law Offices of Jonathan M. Cooper

New York Noncompete, Trade Secret & School Negligence Blog

This blog by the six-time published author Jonathan Cooper, is intended to educate the general public about issues of interest, particularly innovations and changes in the law, in the areas of non-compete agreements, breach of contract matters, school negligence (and/or negligent supervision), construction accidentsslip and/or trip and fall accidentsauto accidents, and, of course, defective or dangerous products

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8/24/2011
Jonathan Cooper
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Technicality Splits NY Appeals Court in Right to New Negligence Trial

Technicality Splits NY Appeals Court in Right to New Negligence Trial

Category: Keyword Search: jury

9/21/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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For those who have little or no faith in our jury system, take notice. Sometimes, juries get it absolutely right.

Recently, a New York jury concluded that a chemical manufacturer was not responsible (or "liable," in legalese) for an electrical worker's injuries that were sustained when he sprayed the defendant's degreaser while leaning against the top of a utility pole that he was attempting to repair, and then suffered a severe shock.

Although the plaintiff contended that the spray did not adequately warn him that the spray could conduct electricity, and threfore, that there was a risk of sustaining a shock, the defense pointed out that the plaintiff had stepped out of his protective rubber basket, and was not wearing appropriate protective gloves. In short, the jury found that the plaintiff was responsible for his own accident.

This story is yet another example of why there are so few successful defective products lawsuits.

 





Category: Keyword Search: jury

6/5/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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Sometimes those of us who litigate and try cases for a living, whether in the context of small business litigation, personal injury or defective products lawsuits,  tend to get "tunnel vision," and fail to see the forest for the trees. That's why an otherwise unremarkable jury verdict out of the Federal Court in Brooklyn, New York is important: it is a potent reminder to trial lawyers everywhere to remain mindful of the credibility of your witnesses in evaluating the viability and value your case.

In this particular case, there was a stark factual discrepancy between the plaintiff, who alleged that he was pushed off the roof of a 3 story apartment building by a police officer that was chasing him, and the police officer's claim that the plaintiff was in the process of running away from the police when the plaintiff lost his grip on the roof's ledge.

The jury sided with the plaintiff, finding more credible the claim by plaintiff. I suspect that the reason they bought plaintiff's version of events is because he conceded that the police officer did not intend to push him off the roof; according to the plaintiff, the police officer merely intended to push him off of a short 2 foot high paparet wall. And by conceding that small point, or "giving a little," he got a lot: the jury awarded him $4.6 million in damages for his personal injuries, which were quite severe: a fractured spine which resulted in paralysis.

 



Category: Keyword Search: jury

2/9/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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Stars' Admissions of Drug Use And Lessons We Can Apply At Trial

New York Lawyer Jonathan Cooper looks at sports and drugs

Category: Keyword Search: jury