Go to navigation Go to content
Toll-Free: (888) 497-3410
Phone: 516.791.5700
Law Offices of Jonathan M. Cooper

New York Noncompete, Trade Secret & School Negligence Blog

This blog by the six-time published author Jonathan Cooper, is intended to educate the general public about issues of interest, particularly innovations and changes in the law, in the areas of non-compete agreements, breach of contract matters, school negligence (and/or negligent supervision), construction accidentsslip and/or trip and fall accidentsauto accidents, and, of course, defective or dangerous products

For additional information on any of these topics, readers are encouraged to download these FREE e-books:

 


2/4/2019
Comments (0)

Staunchly for Tort Reform, At Least Until it's His Own Case

Sen. Rand Paul just won a jury award over $500,000. If he had his way on tort reform, though, he wouldn't have gotten even half that amount.

Category: Keyword Search: tort reform

8/17/2011
Jonathan Cooper
Comments (0)

Why Jury Verdict Reports From a NY Personal Injury Case May Be Misleading

Long Island & Queens, NY car accident & personal injury attorney Jonathan Cooper on why jury verdict reports from a NY car accident case may be misleading.

Category: Keyword Search: tort reform

9/21/2010
Jonathan Cooper
Comments (0)

Before Touting Your Pro Tort Reform Credentials, Consider This

Long Island/Queens, New York truck accident and child injury attorney Jonathan Cooper discusses a recent case where a trucker who fell asleep at the wheel crashed into a school bus full of children. For additional information on this topic, please contact Jonathan Cooper directly at 516-791-5700.

Category: Keyword Search: tort reform

7/21/2009
Jonathan Cooper
Comments (0)
Yesterday, msnbc published a fascinating story on the University of Michigan Health System, which, unlike nearly every other health care facility in the Country, has seen the number of medical malpractice claims (and concurrently, the amounts paid out on claims) against it cut in half over the last several years. This is no fluke. Their secret? When they make a mistake, they own up to it and apologize. In the words of their general counsel, they are practicing "basic common decency." As a corollary to this approach, this particular health care system actively tries to make fair offers to resolve meritorious cases early on, rather than allowing the cases to wind their way through the court system for years, and in the process, incurring higher defense costs. Not surprisingly, this tactic tends to lessen the patients' anger, and less likely to sue. Given the obvious logic and fantastic success of this program, it is apparent that this approach should be made a central component of any tort reform package, don't you think?

Category: Keyword Search: tort reform

6/7/2009
Jonathan Cooper
Comments (0)
Following a recent story on CNN which reported that Chrysler's bankruptcy filing would mean that personal injury lawsuits against the auto manufacturer would now effectively be barred, the predictable response from tort reform advocates of "WHO CARES," was prominently displayed in the blog comments section of the report. My response to that is simple: you should. And here's why: even if you don't drive a Chrysler, someone else who's on the road with you just might. And if no one in the manufacturing  or distribution chain of that vehicle has any incentive to make sure that their consumers are apprised of any defects in the vehicle, whether in its design or manufacture, guess who's being put at risk? That's right - not only the drivers of those vehicles, but everyone around them, including you and me. So before anyone's too quick to dismiss as inconsequential this corollary to Chrysler's bankruptcy filing, perhaps they should take a broader view of the broader impact on consumer safety, and consider the possible impact on them.

Category: Keyword Search: tort reform

3/8/2009
Jonathan Cooper
Comments (0)
Although there has been much written and reported about defective and hazardous drywall material made in China, a report that came out earlier today on this subject is downright frightening. According to Florida-based News-Press.com, it appears that officials from the Environmental Protection Agency, among other governmental entities (including the Florida Department of Health), waited at least 2 months from the time that they knew of the potential health or toxic hazard that these materials caused until notifying the public because they wanted to coordinate their efforts with a prominent builder that had used much of these materials, and to avoid any hysteric reaction caused by "sweeps week" on televsion.

To put this in context, following is a partial list of the complaints received regarding the Chinese-manufactured drywall:

the faulty drywall gives off a rotten-egg smell, and also gives off chemicals that rust air conditioning coils and either tarnishes or ruins other metals inside the home, including jewelry, electrical wiring, and plumbing. Those living in homes with the defective product have complained of experiencing respiratory difficulties, nausea and skin-related problems that tend to lessen when leaving the home, and are aggravated while at home. These are hardly "minor" discomforts.


At the very least, this story should help inform the tort reform debate, in order to assure that people with legitimate claims are not left subject to the whim (and perhaps, irresponsibility) of governmental officials whose agenda does not have the public's safety as their foremost concern.




Category: Keyword Search: tort reform