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Law Offices of Jonathan M. Cooper

New York Noncompete, Trade Secret & School Negligence Blog

This blog by the six-time published author Jonathan Cooper, is intended to educate the general public about issues of interest, particularly innovations and changes in the law, in the areas of non-compete agreements, breach of contract matters, school negligence (and/or negligent supervision), construction accidentsslip and/or trip and fall accidentsauto accidents, and, of course, defective or dangerous products

For additional information on any of these topics, readers are encouraged to download these FREE e-books:

 


7/11/2012
Jonathan Cooper
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NY State Takes Steps to Limit Traumatic Brain Injury to Students

Long Island, NY school injury attorney Jonathan Cooper discusses New York's "concussion management and awareness act."

Category: Keyword Search: traumatic brain injury

7/20/2011
Jonathan Cooper
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Why It's Hard to Win a Brain Injury Case in New York

Long Island & Queens, NY school injury & negligence lawyer Jonathan Cooper discusses why it's hard to win a brain injury claim in New York.

Category: Keyword Search: traumatic brain injury

7/13/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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In an unusual move, an appeals court reinstated a jury's award which had been reduced from $2 million to $600,000, to a pedestrian who was knocked down by a passing truck, causing him to sustain severe personal injuries, including traumatic brain injuries and several fractures that left him in a coma for over one month.

As anyone who has experience selecting juries for trial will tell you, what is not unusual or suprising is that this aspect of the story - the reinstatement of the 7-figure verdict made the news. Nor, for that matter, would it have surprised anyone had the news reported on the jury's verdict; what would have been surprising was if the news had covered the judge's reduction of the award by nearly 2/3 - a fact of trial life that often confronts personal injury lawyers, but rarely - if ever - makes the headlines.

Category: Keyword Search: traumatic brain injury

4/23/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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After reviewing the Consumer Products Safety Commission's progress reports regarding 25 recalled products and finding that several of the reports were either completely lacking critical information or internally conflicted, non-profit group Kids In Danger concluded in its annual report that the CPSC could not effectively determine whether these recalls were in fact successful or effective. In addition, the report opined that the CPSC's oversight of its product recalls was insufficient, because not enough was or is being done to notify consumers of the product recalls, as a result of which many of these dangerous products are remaining in consumer's homes or school facilities, rather than being taken out of circulation.

The CPSC's response to this report, which predictably defended their record on the recalls, also contained a somewhat interesting claim: according to their spokesman,  the primary method by which the CPSC  determines if its recalls are working is by waiting to see whether they are still receiving reports of problems with the product.

From this statement, it seems like the CPSC's follow-up on any one of its product recalls is largely, if not purely, reactive. Thus, theoretically, the CPSC would determine that one of its recalls failed only after someone suffered a tragic accident or traumatic personal injuries.

I, for one, would have hoped that this massive governmental agency, whose mission statement accepts responsibility for assuring the safety of our children from unsafe toys and other recreational and household products, would have a far more scientifically sound and proactive method for assessing the success of a product recall.



Category: Keyword Search: traumatic brain injury

2/23/2009
Jonathan Cooper
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Play At Your Own Risk: A Valid Legal Concept Under New York Law?

In this article, published author and Long Island, New York child accident and personal injury lawyer Jonathan Cooper discusses whether those signs declaring 'play at your own risk' have any validity under New York law. For additional information on how accident cases are generally evaluated and handled in New York, you can order a FREE copy of Jonathan Cooper's book Why Most Accident Victims Do Not Recover the Full Value of Their Claim by filling out the contact form at www.TheNewYorkAccidentBook.com or at his website at www.JonathanCooperLaw.com.

Category: Keyword Search: traumatic brain injury